Saturday, January 26, 2008

Rose

“They were marvelous red roses that had blossomed in the morning,
in the snow, giving a glimpse of life among the dead,
for death was all around him."

The rose is a beautiful flower. It's been adored throughout history. A flower of romance and symbolism. We write songs and poems about it. We hold tournaments and parades in its honor. We crush its fragrant petals to make perfume. It's the flower of choice to give to someone you love, as the Phantom did with a black ribbon tied around its stem.

As beautiful as the rose is, however, it holds a hidden dark side. If it's not handled carefully in its beauty, it can cause great pain. How interesting that nature has designed a flower so beautiful to look at, but so painful to the touch. Has nature (or God) left a message in creation that as beautiful as romantic love can be, it can contain a thorn to pierce our hearts as well?

In the Phantom of the Opera Christine carries the red rose he's given her to the rooftop. After she declares her love for Raoul, she drops the rose that the Phantom had given her in the cold snow. As he picks up the discarded symbol of his love, he feels the thorn of rejection once again in the beauty of the rose. Rejection doesn't always drive us to madness as it did the Phantom, but it can drive us to heartbreak that is nearly unbearable.

Rejection from someone we love is no doubt the most powerful human hurt any individual can experience. Perhaps you live with the thorn of rejection because you cannot find love and acceptance from someone either. I speak from my heart that this writer has felt the power of the thorn in my own life and the rejection from one I loved deeply.

So what can we say about the passion of love? Do we learn to handle it carefully, overwhelmed by its beauty and aroma, but always cautious that we never use its hidden thorn to pierce another person's heart? If we have already been the victim of its pierce, how do we overcome the hurt and pain? There is really no right answer or counsel for a broken heart or rejection from the one we love. Does time heal all wounds? Perhaps. Do we need to carry the hurt forever? Not necessarily. Does the pain eventually subside? In a slow way it does.

Perhaps we should learn another lesson from the rose and the Phantom who crushed its petals. That even after the rose fades, its petals fall, it's been pruned and remains dormant throughout the winter of our lives, eventually it will bloom again in spring more beautiful than before. The next time a rose blooms in your life, may it bring to you only beauty and no pain.

The Phantom's Student

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14 comments:

phantomluva13 said...

Can you find the meaning behind "Keep your hand at the level of your eyes?" I would like to know. Thank you!

Vicki said...

"Keep your hand at the level of your eyes" is a defense technique so that if the Phantom tries throws a noose around a person's neck, the victim can easily free themselves so they are not strangled.

Stookiglia said...

Hi!
I'm so glad I found this blog. It looks amazing and I'm looking forward to reading all the posts.
This post was so beautiful written. You are very good with words.
A rose really symbolizes love. Both the bauty and the pain.

Gio said...

Can someone tell me the symbolism of the black ribbon around the rose?

Anonymous said...

This post reminds me of the song "The Rose", made famous by Bette Midler:

"Just remember, in the winter, far beneath the bitter snows, lies the seed, that with the sun's love in the spring becomes the rose"

Morgan said...

I'm also trying to figure out the symbolism of the black ribbon, does anybody know?

Avalonesque said...

Presumably in reference to the black rimmed letters the phantom sends and that one may assume to be a reference to death.

RoseOfTransylvania said...

Ah, I love red roses - such immaculate, sumptuous flowers! And roses make fantastic image in 2004 movie.

CeeCee said...

I can't remember how I found this blog... I was googling Phantom stuff after watching the 25th anniversary performance twice... now here I am.

I've been scanning some posts and just had to start at the very beginning. I know I'm going to learn so much reading this blog.

Great job!

CeeCee said...

"Rejection from someone we love is no doubt the most powerful human hurt any individual can experience. Perhaps you live with the thorn of rejection because you cannot find love and acceptance from someone either." -- argh... unfortunately I can relate!

Anonymous said...

Since the rose symbolized the phantoms love for Christine, and it appeared once again on her grave, one can assume that the phantom never stopped loving Christine, but loved her so much that he was willing to free her from his lair. He said himself, when she left, “it’s over now the music of the night.” The fact that he also held on to the engagement ring and put it on her grave along with the rose signifies that his love for her was true and passionate.

Anonymous said...

the black ribbon may also symbolize the the darkness the phantom kept urging Christine to give into. her temptations perhaps?

Anonymous said...

I think the black ribbon wrapped around the rose signifies the perceptions of the Phantoms own inner darkness possibly being saved by the beauty of the rose....and maybe he was even after letting her go...because his love for her saved him as well....

Blahhhhh1878 said...

It’s so he can not hang you because it’s harder to get the rope around your neck to I’ll you if you can get out because your hand